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3GT Episode 26: Technolatry

Barry the old guy is still uncomfortable with technology, especially when it looks like a pretty woman. Aaron and Kyle dodge the ball a bit at first, waxing philosophical about technology and warning about being  too Amish. But then Aaron starts tackling AI humanoids and the Turing Test. Kyle warns against the danger of the Tower of Babel mentality. Creators as well as consumers are warned. Movies like Ex Machina and Her get referenced. Can the Larger Catechism and the Ten Commandments save the day?

https://threeguystheologizing.files.wordpress.com/2017/01/3gt-episode26-12817-2-18-pm.mp3

Article: Chinese humanoid robot turns on the charm in Shanghai

The Distinction between Deacons and Elders

One difficulty the church often runs into is making proper distinctions. We confuse laws with principles of wisdom. We don’t know what Jesus meant when he said communion bread is his body. We hear about grace and think it is licentiousness. And when it comes to the church offices of deacon and elder, we can experience a similar difficulty in seeing the differences.

Some churches do not have deacons. Others call their leaders deacons and do not have elders. Many congregations that have both elders and deacons run into problems because the lines of authority and responsibility are not clear.

As with any confusion, the best place to return for clarity is to the Scriptures. For they make clear that the diaconate is a distinct office from that of the eldership. Paul wrote to the church at Philippi and greeted “all the saints in Christ Jesus who are at Philippi,” then addressed both “the overseers and deacons” (Phil. 1:1). In giving the qualifications for office to Timothy, he offered separate lists for both of these positions (I Timothy 3:1-13). From the testimony of the rest of the New Testament, we can see how deacons are differentiated from the overseers or elders. Clearly deacons, whose […]

3GT Episode 25: I Was Born a Ramblin’ Man

No, this episode is not about Kyle’s preaching. Rather, the guys have been on the road and explain their travels. Their wanderings take them to a discussion about the doctor of ministry degree and the importance of continuing education for pastors. And we rejoice that far from rambling, Kyle just celebrated a decade of settled marital bliss!

https://threeguystheologizing.files.wordpress.com/2017/01/3gt-episode25-12817-1-30-pm.mp3

What Remembering the Poor Really Means

When the apostles eventually confirmed the Lord’s commission for Paul to go to the Gentiles, according to him they gave him one final admonition. “They only asked us to remember the poor—the very thing I also was eager to do” (Gal 2:10). Part and parcel of pastoral and church planting ministry is then this duty to remember the poor. Yet what does it really mean to remember them?

It is easy to associate the word remember simply with the idea of acknowledging or being aware of a circumstance. We can shake our heads sadly and muse, “Yes, it’s too bad there are so many poor people in that part of town.” Like the politician who famously said of the struggling, “I feel your pain” while remaining at a distance from them, we can think it sufficient to know of the existence of the plight of others and feel sorry for them. But in the Bible, to remember means something much more than bringing to mind a matter.

Like many of the commandments found in the New Testament, such as the great commandments to love God and neighbor, this call to remember the poor is an echo of Old Testament law. Israel was […]

The Call of Widowhood

Because of sad, hard, tragic providence, over the last few years a number of friends and a family member have become widows. In praying for and interacting with these dear women, Miriam and I have seen how lonely and difficult their new status can be. In reflecting on this both personally and biblically, one thought that might be helpful is to see widowhood as a calling.

When a Christian woman becomes a wife, she takes her vows before the Lord and receives her new role with her husband as a calling. She becomes his helper (Gen. 2:18), his closest companion by covenant (Mal. 2:14), and the delight of his life (Gen 2:23; Song of Sol. 4). By submitting herself to his leadership, usually symbolized in our culture by the woman taking her husband’s last name, the wife has linked her identity with him (Eph. 5:22-33). They have become one. If the Lord blesses them with children, the woman sees her calling as a wife expanded into motherhood (Gen. 1:28; Ps. 113:9). We typically do not balk at the idea of becoming and being a wife as a calling.

But what about widowhood? Can that not also be considered a calling of a unique […]

Browse Worthy: The Immigration Crisis

With so many protests and so much in the news about the president’s immigration ban, here are a few articles hopefully to encourage calm, reasoned thinking on the matter.

Trump’s order is a balm for Christians, not a ban on Muslims | Carol Swain

An opinion piece on CNN that comments on the actual text of President Trump’s order.

Evangelical Experts Oppose Trump’s Refugee Ban | Kate Shellnut

This article features the difficulty that agencies like World Relief have following the president’s actions and, despite its title, offers perspectives from leading Christians on both sides of the issue.

Ten Theses on Immigration | Ross Douthat

This New York Time article brings some fascinating insights from social science research to this issue.

Exclusive: The letter Russell Moore will send Trump about the refugee order | Russell Moore

Dr. Moore already sent his letter but it is worth reading, especially as an example of addressing our leaders on this matter.

The Immigration Crises May Be a Providential Call to Make a Move | Jennifer Oshman

Become an immigrant yourself? May sound crazy, but when I read this link at Tim Challies’ site I understood.

But I Do, Dad

You are often there, in the edges of my dreams. Quiet. Not speaking. 

Not like you were in life. Working, hunting, fishing, fixing – always using your hands. And always, always a story to tell or a tease to offer. You were unable to suppress the grin, the crow’s feet forming around smiling, brown eyes. Yet there, in hazy dreams, you are silent, just watching. A presence. The others do not see you. 

But I do. 

When the sun rises and I’m off into my day, the dreams dissipate like the morning mist. Then, softly and quickly, wispy memories bring you back. As in my dreams, you are there. Quiet. No one sees you. 

But I do.

When my son, who never knew or saw you, moves his hands like you did when he tells a story. When I see the flashing, dark eyes and hear the big laugh of my daughter. When I use a tool, then clean it and put it back in its place like you told me to do a thousand times. When I open that wooden box Uncle Pete made and see your initials on the blade of your knife. When men speak of leading and I remember the kind way that you […]